Celebrating 6 years online
Celebrating the final season
Celebrating 100 Episodes
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Welcome to Teen Wolf Online - your ultimate source for all things related to MTV's Teen Wolf. You can find spoilers, screencaptures, cast photos, information about the cast and everything else that is related to the MTV hit series. Teen Wolf Online is in no way affiliated with the cast and crew of the series. No copyright infringement is ever intended. xo admin
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I have added stills of Dylan O’Brien as Mitch Rapp in “American Assassin” photo archives


October 14, 2017


I have added promotional photos of Dylan O’Brien as Mitch Rapp in “American Assassin” photo archives


October 14, 2017


Here we are… More than six years after Teen Wolf’s series premiere. Teen Wolf’s series premiere was on June 5th, 2011 and this website launched on the 14th of July that same year.
I am very, very proud of how far Teen Wolf has come and with that I’m also very proud of Teen Wolf Online, a website – a fansite that I’ve been maintaining on my own all these years.

From the bottom of my heart, I thank every single cast and crew member, but most importantly, I’d like to thank Jeff Davis, the executive producer for creating this series.
Jeff has created relationships, friendships that last for an entire lifetime. This series has the most brilliant cast, and I can not think of anyone to be able to portray each character.
From Scott McCall to the Nogitsune, from the Nogitsune to the Anuk-Ite and everything before, in between and after that… It was brilliant, it was perfect.

Here are a few ‘thank you’s’ I want to hand out, just a few of my personal favorites;

Orny Adams as the Coach: Brilliant, funny, sassy even. Orny portrayed a character who brought a lot of light to the series.
Stephen Lunsford as Matt (Season 2): I’m still sad that his character didn’t make it through the entire series. The whole scene between him and Dylan was perfect.

Melissa Ponzio as Melissa McCall: I need a mom like her. I will never forget to be my own anchor.

Dylan O’Brien as (Void) Stiles: Ha… What’s there to say about Dylan that the world doesn’t already know? Teen Wolf was his first acting job. I instantly felt the connected between Dylan and Tyler, but what did it for me was Season 3B. Void Stiles. “YOU CAN’T KILL ME!”

Linden Ashby as Sheriff Stillinski: The first time I saw Linden on screen was years ago: Mortal Kombat. So he already had me there. Linden portrayed the role of a protective, loving, badass father perfectly. Again, it was a perfect score for the cast. The scenes he had with Dylan were all beautiful.

JR Bourne as Chris Argent: To be honest… I didn’t like Argent at all at first. I’m so glad he switched teams and joined Scott to hunt his own family. Argent had lost EVERYTHING; his wife, his daughter – even his father, but I’ll get to that in a minute. JR was amazing, especially this last season. Loved to see him work with Scott.

Michael Hogan as Gerard Argent: Do I really need to say anything about Michael? There were times I could literally kick his ass. He was brilliant as Gerard and the best villain the show has had. Period. The way he says “mountain ash”……

Thank you. Every single one of you, thank you. I will forever hold Teen Wolf dear to my heart.

And even though the series has ended, Teen Wolf Online will NOT end. I’ll keep tabs on the cast and crew of the series. Dylan O’Brien can currently be seen in “American Assassin” and will be seen in “The Maze Runner: The Death Cure” in 2018 while both Tyler Posey and Andrew Matarazzo can be seen in The CW’s Jane the Virgin’s fourth season. Colton Haynes might return as Roy Harper for The CW’s Arrow sixth season and JR Bourne can be seen in ABC’s “Somewhere Between”.

So, as I’ve mentioned… Teen Wolf Online will stick around for everything related to the cast and crew and of course the Teen Wolf podcast, The Hollywood Reporter published in July earlier this year;

“These characters and these stories have hit a peak,” MTV president Chris McCarthy tells The Hollywood Reporter. “We are talking with Jeff about how do we actually keep that franchise alive. And the beauty of the evolution of media is you can see the series going on through a series of podcasts and then see a resurrection of a new class in a couple years.”

So sit back, relax… And enjoy this new ride with us!

Regards,



This article contains spoilers. Don’t read this if you haven’t watched the series finale of Teen Wolf.

“I thought about what kind of series finale fits this show best, and to me, it was, ‘And the adventure continues …,’ ” ‘Teen Wolf’ creator and showrunner Jeff Davis tells The Hollywood Reporter;

Sunday’s Teen Wolf series finale on MTV felt less like an ending and more like the beginning of a new chapter for Scott McCall (Tyler Posey) and his pack of friends.

After a season of fighting Gerard Argent (Michael Hogan) and Tamora Monroe’s (Sibongile Mlambo) reign of fear against the supernatural in Beacon Hills, Scott, Stiles (Dylan O’Brien), Lydia (Holland Roden), Derek (Tyler Hoechlin), Malia (Shelley Hennig), Chris Argent (JR Bourne), Sheriff Noah Stilinski (Linden Ashby), Jackson (Colton Haynes), Ethan (Charlie Carver) and Peter Hale (Ian Bohen) won the battle for their town. Unfortunately, the war continued, as Monroe escaped alive to expand her agenda on a global scale.

The 100th and final episode of MTV’s supernatural drama, while dealing mostly with the fight against the Anuk-Ite fear monster and saving Beacon Hills from all-out war, was bookended by scenes of Scott and Argent saving a young werewolf named Alec (Benjamin Wadsworth), a new character on the run from Monroe’s hunters. Scott and Argent helped him get to safety and invited him to join the Beacon Hills pack to fight the thousands of new hunters that Monroe enlisted in her war to kill every single supernatural being. Instead of offering a satisfying conclusion to the story, Teen Wolf ended on a hopeful shot of Scott’s pack welcoming Alec into their group.

Series creator and showrunner Jeff Davis spoke with The Hollywood Reporter about bringing MTV’s first scripted drama to an end after six seasons, the surprising influences he used to write the finale, his disappointment over who he couldn’t get to come back for the final episode and more.

Has it hit you that the series has come to an end?
It’s a very strange thing. I’ve never written a series finale before. I’ve never said goodbye to a project like this. I’ve never had anything in my work life like this. It’s hard to say goodbye, but [I’m] also getting ready for new challenges.

In writing your first series finale, what was the most important goal you needed to accomplish?
It was really to both pay homage to the series itself with clever callbacks and big moments for each character. But the most important thing was to tell a good Teen Wolf story, to make it a great Teen Wolf episode with action, with humor, with romance and to give each character their heroic moment. There was a scene when we watched it all together [at the cast and crew finale screening] that everybody cheered, a great scene with Sheriff Stilinski.

While a lot of the episode felt very final with the relationships between the characters, why did you want to leave the story open-ended?
I thought a lot about other series finales and certain ones that leave the audience gasping, wondering what happens next, like The Sopranos, or some where they send the whole cast to jail, like Seinfeld, and others, like Lost, where everybody is dead and they find each other in the afterlife. I thought about what kind of series finale fits this show best, and to me, it was, “And the adventure continues …” That’s what we wanted to go for. I want to know that Scott and his friends have many more stories to tell. This story isn’t over. He goes off and fights many more battles, makes new friends, faces down new enemies. That felt right for the finale. And I was also able to get people like Tyler Hoechlin and Dylan O’Brien in that last shot as part of Scott’s pack from day one onward. It’s a testament to the show and how many people loved working on the show that everybody came back.

You introduced a new character, Alec, in the finale. With a new incarnation of Teen Wolf in development, first as a podcast before being rebooted altogether, does he have anything to do with those plans?
It’s all just been talks so far. That character, that whole idea that bookends [the episode], that was something I came up with a long time ago. Tyler Posey actually pitched me, “I have an idea for the finale that I wake up in a motel room, and it’s a year or two later, and it’s me and Argent.” I was like, “I love that idea.” And we did that. But that character [of Alec], to me, represents the audience. There was no real thought of introducing a character to reboot the show. It was simply this kid, Alec, played by Ben Wadsworth, who is this outsider, a kid on the run, on his own, and Scott says to him, “If you feel like an outsider, if you feel alone, you can be one of us. You can be with us.” That’s the message of the show and the big message of this season, which was about fear, being a pariah.

Why did you want to continue the Teen Wolf brand immediately after the final season, instead of waiting a few years?
Part of that was [MTV president] Chris McCarthy’s idea. He has a real love for the show. The previous regime wanted to sweep everything out and start fresh, but Chris wants to keep a good thing going. I’m hopefully going to be working with them on other projects. We have [a female-driven] War of the Worlds as a possibility, and we just handed the script in for that, so things could be good with me and MTV for a little while longer.

What kinds of stories do you want to continue from Teen Wolf, and why in podcast form?
I think there’s plenty of spinoff ideas. I would love to see Jackson and Ethan in London as a podcast. (Laughs.) Have one eight-episode, maybe, podcast about an adventure they go through there. I could see any sort of spinoff within that world. If Hoechlin would be up for it, [I want to] follow [Derek in a podcast]. You know who would actually be great at it would be Daniel Sharman. If I could convince Daniel Sharman to reprise Isaac, because Daniel has done audiobook recordings, I bet he would be great at a podcast. And podcasts are amazing these days. I just listened to S-Town a little while ago, and it was riveting. I couldn’t step out of my car because I had to finish it. So it’s really fascinating to me how this very old-school storytelling device has come back in vogue. It’s basically radio drama coming back to life.

There were so many amazing character returns in the finale, especially when the Anuk-Ite started taking on forms of Scott’s biggest fears, like Void Stiles. Which character return was the hardest to pull off?
Hardest to pull off in terms of narrative, none of them. They all seemed to fit seamlessly back into the show. The hardest to pull off in terms of scheduling was definitely Dylan O’Brien. But he made it work, to his credit. He loves the role, and he said, “I want to be part of the finale. I want to be part of the last season. I’ll make it work.” The difficulty was, I actually had to write most of episode 20, the finale, before the scripts for episode 18 and 19 were even finished. (Laughs.) That’s a challenge when you have one week with this actor before he flies off to do his movie.

With Dylan’s limited availability, were there any plans to have Stiles and Derek’s FBI hunt storyline expanded that you couldn’t carry out?
I would have loved to have them both for more episodes, yeah. Hoechlin was great, and it was really nice to get Hoechlin in two episodes. When you don’t have them locked down and you don’t own their time, their schedules get crazy. My first and second ADs tear their hair out trying to get everyone to show up on set at the same time. And one actor I wish I could have had for another episode was Colton. In episode 19, he couldn’t be in it. So we were only able to show Charlie Carver. I would have loved to have [Jackson and Ethan] together in that episode, too. Unfortunately, in the narrative, we had to split them up, but Colton was very busy working for Ryan Murphy. (Laughs.) I’m very happy for him.

Were there any character returns you wanted for the finale but couldn’t get?
My biggest disappointment is, there were two people, and it was both a problem of scheduling. I would have loved to have Meagan Tandy as Braeden, and I would have loved to have Seth Gilliam as Deaton. I had actually started writing a whole plotline for Seth in the finale, and then we just couldn’t get him because of his schedule with Walking Dead.

Are you able to reveal what his finale storyline would have been, if he could have shot it?
I would have wanted him to be a part of the figuring it out of it all and to give him a heroic moment, as well. Honestly, most important in the last episode was that Scott had a big story, that we bring it around back to the teen wolf. It’s OK that we didn’t have certain other characters because it started with Tyler Posey, and I love the fact that it ends with him.

There were several callbacks to the pilot and big moments throughout the series. What line or callback meant the most to you?
I loved when Gerard says, “Mountain ash,” which is a callback to his screaming the words “mountain ash” in the finale of season two. I said to the director, Russell Mulcahy, “This time I want him to just whisper it.” That was really fun and just like that finale of season two. Those little clever callbacks were so fun to do.

Lydia and Stiles each had fun reactions to finding out about Jackson and Ethan. What was important to you in getting that moment right?
It was hitting the humor of it, and it was also having [Jackson’s ex] Lydia know. Having her thinking to herself, “This kid will be so much better when he figures it all out.” And a little bit of it was, it’s really nice to see Colton having come out in his real life and having it change him so much and become a different, better person. That scene was one of the easiest to write because I knew how I wanted to make people laugh.

In the final act of the finale, Kate (Jill Wagner), who was shot with fatal yellow wolfsbane, attacked Gerard after Argent left the room, but they both have survived so many near-death experiences before. Since their deaths weren’t explicitly shown onscreen, what are their official fates by the end of the series?
(Laughs.) Who knows? Those two always have a way of coming back to life, don’t they? I’ll leave that question unanswered.

Fair enough. Was this the series ending you always had in mind back when the show first premiered, or has it changed over the course of 100 episodes?
It’s definitely changed. I had this idea of Scott meeting this young werewolf back in season four. But to be honest, when we were doing season five, I thought 5:20 was going to be the last episode until the network came and said, “We want 20 more.” So I’m glad we got to do it this way. This felt like a big goodbye and an epic story. I like the fact that it became worldwide as well. I’m really glad to have had the opportunity to finish off the series with that foreknowledge and to prepare for it. And I’m really happy that all these actors wanted to come back to roles that they hadn’t played for a while.



Holland Roden took to Instagram to share her love for Teen Wolf’s cast and crew and said “My Family Forever!”

"My friends. My pack." -Scott McCall My family forever. ❤️ @teenwolf

Een bericht gedeeld door Holland Roden (@hollandroden) op





Colton Haynes also took to Instagram to thank the fans and shared a couple of throwback photos.

My family forever. #TeenWolf #teenwolffinale

Een bericht gedeeld door Colton Haynes (@coltonlhaynes) op



September 25, 2017


In the epic finale to the Maze Runner saga, Thomas leads his group of escaped Gladers on their final and most dangerous mission yet. To save their friends, they must break into the legendary Last City, a WCKD-controlled labyrinth that may turn out to be the deadliest maze of all. Anyone who makes it out alive will get answers to the questions the Gladers have been asking since they first arrived in the maze.

The Maze Runner: The Death Cure will be in Theaters January 26, 2018!

September 25, 2017


Spoiler alert: This post contains plot details from the series finale of Teen Wolf.

In Teen Wolf‘s final hour (and change), Scott and his pack defeated Gerard and Monroe’s army. But even though they won the battle for Beacon Hills, the war had only just begun, which is why the series ended with Scott and company heading out to recruit more soldiers and continue on to the next battle.

EW spoke with Teen Wolf showrunner Jeff Davis about the finale, its many callbacks, and whether he ever considered killing any main characters.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: What was the inspiration behind the idea to bring in a new werewolf in the finale?
JEFF DAVIS:
That was an idea I had a while ago, back around the fourth season actually. I’d always thought it would be interesting to see Scott out in the world somewhere meeting this new young kid who’s frightened and alone and basically speaking the words to him that I want the show to say to every audience member, which is if you feel like an outsider, if you feel alone, you don’t have to be. You’ll find your pack and you can be one of us. So the character of Alec, he represents our audience and the message of the show.

So is Gerard dead?
You can never tell with Gerard. He always seems to pop back up, doesn’t he?

All major characters survived for the most part. Did you ever think about killing a main character?
There was a time when I was thinking: Who do we kill, how do we make this momentous? And then you have to think: Is this a show where the series finale should have half the cast die off and blow up the show at the end? I thought to myself, I don’t want to see most of these people die, I want to see them off together again on another adventure. Even watching them walk toward us at the end, there were people I missed. There were people I would’ve liked to see with them, including Allison. I don’t think it would’ve been our show if we’d killed off half the characters. There was a moment I told Cody Christian we were going to kill his character off, and by the time we got to around episode 16 or 17, I said to him, “I can’t kill you.” [Laughs] I think he was hoping for an epic death scene.

In terms of the Allison references, was that an obvious choice to make her a part of this?
Yes, it was. It was absolutely necessary because she was such a momentous character in the lives of the other characters, Lydia and Scott mostly, and Argent of course. But we want to pay homage to it and a lot of a series finale is tipping your hat and giving a nod to the previous seasons.

Which you did in a huge way in that library scene…
[Laughs] Yes, yes we did. And that was one of the ideas behind it. I think it works because it’s organic, it all comes out of this creature of fear that brings out these things in you, that gets in your head. It was a way to have Scott face all of his fears in one final moment and tell this creature: You can’t beat me; I’ve conquered all these fears.

I was so excited to see Void Stiles again!
Yes! That was really fun and Dylan O’Brien was really happy to play him. I remember being on set and saying to him, “You get to play Void Stiles again,” and he was really happy about it. It’s a way of saying goodbye to these characters.

Was it the same person playing the Nogitsune?
Yep, Aaron Hendry, who also played a character called Brunski, the one who tries to kill Lydia in Eichen House. He is a phenomenal actor. And that’s his voice, by the way. That’s all him.

The moment where Theo took Gabe’s pain. Is that a step on the path to redemption for him?
Yeah, he’s on his way to redemption. He’s got a lot to pay for, murder being one of them. But when we were talking about Mason and Theo in the tunnels I remember saying, “There’s got to be a bigger moment here for Theo.” We’ve seen him trying to be a good guy. He tries to take Mason’s pain and Mason says to him, “It doesn’t work if you don’t care, you have to care.” In that moment, he cares, even for his enemy. He sees a corrupted person just like him dying.

Was the Malia-Scott kiss a purposeful callback to Stiles and Lydia’s first kiss when she helped him focus during a panic attack?
That’s entirely on purpose, that’s why Lydia says “kiss him.” She looks at Stiles and remembers [that] this is how I got Stiles to focus. It’s no magic kiss, it’s purely getting the person to concentrate on something else. It’s those little callbacks, that and Gerard whispering “mountain ash,” that makes it fun for a series finale.

Can we assume that Stiles knew about Malia and Scott? I was waiting to see if he’d react.
I think in the world of Teen Wolf, we don’t like to do love triangles and jealousy and all that. I think he’s happy that they found each other. Stiles is with Lydia now; they’re together and if Scott and Malia are right for each other, I think Stiles would be more than happy for them.

How long have you known you wanted to bring back that season 4 line to end the series?
When we came up with that line [in season 4], I pitched the writers. I said, “The last scene of the show could be Scott finding another werewolf and saying those same words: ‘You’re not a monster. You’re a werewolf, like me.’” I love Posey’s delivery of the line. It was just perfect. That’s partially the message of the show: You’re something special. You’re not what those other people tell you you are, you’re something special and you can be with us.

This finale did feel different than most Teen Wolf finales. It was almost less conclusive…
That was very specific. We didn’t want a finale that said “the end.” We wanted it to be an “and the adventure continues…” I like imagining that they’re going off to continue the fight. I didn’t want to see an end where they all have children and they’re happy and at home. That felt anticlimactic to me.

I know you had an extended finale, but was there anything you had to cut or couldn’t work in?
There were a few things. There were a couple actors that I would’ve loved to have back, like Daniel Sharman as Isaac. I would’ve liked to have Meagan Tandy’s Braeden. I had been planning a whole plot line for Deaton, but the episode was getting too long and there was too much difficulty with his schedule, with getting him back from The Walking Dead. That’s one of my regrets. There are definitely things we couldn’t fit in. I would’ve loved to have a 90-minute finale but we got 50 minutes, which is pretty long anyway.



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